Implementing 10-2 Thinking in the classroom has enormous ramifications on the teaching process. Some samples from the chapter on 10-2 Thinking illustrate this point.

From Sheila Webb, a Massachusetts kindergarten teacher, who uses 10-2 consistently: “I love it!” she told me, “The students benefit so much from working with each other. The conversations are appropriate and relative to the lesson. Oftentimes, the reluctant students are right in the group instructions, talking about their own experiences or interpretations”…

When we lecture, we act as conduits, but when we choose 10-2 Thinking, we invoke the interactivity of language, the power of dialogue. We slow down and can apply “wait time” (another of Mary Budd Rowe’s ideas) after asking a question to allow time for students to think before speaking…

Yet some of us still hesitate to cross this threshold to implement 10-2 Thinking for fear it will take time away from covering material. In a forty-five minute lecture, 10-2 “costs” about ten minutes. The obvious contradiction in this argument, however, grants that straight lecturing may allow more time for coverage but sacrifices opportunities for learning…

Using this approach reminds us that the best learning occurs while we are teaching and not afterwards. Eventually, classrooms move towards greater processing times in relation to input. When learning becomes central, the ratio, for example, can shift from 10-2 to 2-10, where the dominant time focuses on processing serious content…

To learn more about the intricacies of 10-2 and the reasons why to use it, see Teaching from the Middle of the Room: Inviting Students to Learn and read “Chapter 1: Implement 10-2.” Purchase from Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Teaching-Middle-Room-Frank-Thoms/dp/0615358918

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